Teen Self-Defence - You're IT!






Fighting to defend oneself is not always the best solution, but sometimes it’s the ONLY solution.1

When we think of the type of trouble our teenaged children might face on a daily basis, parents might put bullying at the top of the list. Although it is true that bullying is a problem that affects everyone, drawing the full attention of school boards, law enformcement and government, we tend to forget the other ways our teens can be harmed. The fact of the matter is they can and do fall victim to other violent personal crimes like swarming, robberies, common assaults, and sexual assaults.

What Makes a Bully Victim?

There are as many studies that define the characteristics of a bully victim as there are for victims of violent crimes. Bullying is a crime but the characteristic that differentiates a bully from a crime victim is this: they are victim of bullying because the are easy targets, meaning the bully is confident the victim won't fight back.

While many adults and experts have come forward to present their views on the issue of what bullying is and what might be the cause, in an effort to either eliminate or mitigate the problem, victims will tell you, “Bullying happens when someone hurts or scares another person on purpose and the person being bullied has a hard time defending themselves.”2 This is what the youth see and deal with every day; this is their reality. So what are the grown ups really doing to make it easier for victims to defend themselves against bullies? I can tell you they are not setting up self-defence programs; in fact, it isn’t even on their ideas list.

Many studies, over the years, fairly agree on the attributes of a bully victim. Besides the more common traits attributed to insecurity, peer rejection, being “different” or physically weak author Rebecca Fraser-Thill listed overprotective parents as a factor3:

“Fraser-Thill believes that teens raised by overprotective parents are more apt to possess many of the above characteristics. Overprotective parents tend to harmonize with their child and avoid a disagreement, all of which likely contributes to a youth lacking the skills to deal with conflict and opens them up to victimization. She adds that such peer rejection will often lead to the parent becoming socially over-involved with their son or daughter – become their only friend, which only makes the situation worse for the victim.”

Is There a Solution? YES!

When the laws and government sponsored programs fall well short of doing what they were designed to do - protect victims and punish the assailant - people are left feeling vulnerable to more violence. This feeling of helplessness can be paralyzing. Take control. Relying on someone else to solve your problem is not the solution because they won't be around when you are facing the bully or assailant on your own.

Training in Combat Hapkido will not only teach you exceptional defensive skills and techniques it will also assist in personal growth by developing your confidence and a can-do attitude. Hapkido is NOT a sport so there are no medals or trophies to compete for. At the East Coast Combat Hapkido Academy you train and advance at your own pace but be assured that each training session incorporates defensive tactics against actual street scenarios.

Should you wish a copy of Master Mike's report, A Hapkidoist's Anti-Bullying Phylosophy and Strategy, please send him an email from the Contact Page.

Testimonials

Read what others have said about training in Combat Hapkido at the East Coast Combat Hapkido Academy:

See you on the mat.

1. Master Mike Fournier CD, East Coast Combat Hapkido Academy. Owner, Security Specialist and Chief Instructor, July 2013.
2. Downloaded from the World Wide Web Bullying Canada site on 3 July, 2013; http://www.bullyingcanada.ca/content/239900.
3. Source: http://tweenparenting.about.com/od/socialdevelopment/a/Typical-Victim-of-Bullying.htm.